‘from Russia With Love’ Series Profiles Gay Couples Living Under Putin’s Rule

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This $95 million SRV1 is a deep water rescue device that can be airlifted to anywhere in the world on short notice, fit on the deck of at least 140 identified ships, and mate with the escape hatches on most of the worlds submarines. The SRV1 has a crew of three and can carry up to 15 men at a time to the surface. It can do this at the rate of 4 hours per trip (to allow for time to deal with decompression, battery recharging, and maintenance). The SRV1 system is shipped in 11 waterproof cargo containers that can be flown by military or civilian cargo aircraft. Including flight time, set up time on the ship, and movement time to the site of the distressed submarine, the NATO SRV should be able to get there and have the SRV in the water within 72 hours. The SRV itself is 10 meters (31 feet) long, weighs 27 tons, and can go as deep as 1,000 meters (3,000 feet, which is the maximum depth for most submarines). Britain, Norway, and France cooperated to design and build SRV1. The U.S. has built a similar system, providing 2 rescue systems to deal with any of the several hundred subs in service. The NATO SRV will be based in Clyde, Scotland and is managed by the UK Ministry of Defense. Back in 2005, an unmanned British minisub arrived by air, and after 6 hours of work, cut free a small Russian rescue sub, allowing it, and its crew of 6, to come to the surface. The Russian sub had gotten snagged in abandoned fishing nets 3 days earlier off the Pacific coast in the Russian northeast. The US also flew out 2 minisubs, but the British got there first and were aided by some American transport troops who had already arrived. The Russians thanked the British and other nations who had rushed assistance to the scene (off the Pacific coast in the Russian Far East). Russia said it would buy 2 of the minisubs that Britain used.

Russia Finally Comes To The Rescue

“Hopefully one day well get a Jack Russell terrier. Right now, we just want simple human happiness.” Victoria and Dasha are just two of the fourteen LGBT subjects profiled in photographer Anastasia Ivanova’s touching series, ” From Russia with Love .” The project, covered in the queer arts and culture journal, Muff Magazine , features images of gay women living under Putin’s presidency, a regime that’s become infamous for its harsh anti-gay legislation . Victoria, 24 and Dasha, 27 “Sometimes our gay friends in Germany, America or England talk about their lives, and we feel as though its another world,” Olgerta and Lisa, two other subjects, told Ivanova. “No doubt they think the same about us, when we tell them of the situation in Russia. Our future is simple. We must leave.” Ivanova, and artistic director EA Bukanova, present the images of LGBT couples of all ages accompanied by personal stories about their relationships and personal lives. The women freely discuss how they met their significant others, the hardships they face as LGBT individuals, and the various hopes and dreams they have for their country. The stories range from beautiful accounts of romance in cities like Moscow and St. Petersburg to disheartening experiences that shed further light on the dismal human rights situation occurring overseas. Scroll through the photos of couples profiled in the story and head over to Muff Magazine for the full accounts. “In the future, all we want is to keep our little family together. Maybe if were lucky one day well have a child.” -Irina, 27 and Antonina, 31 “In public, we try not to hide our feelings, and are determined to hold hands and kiss each other freely, but the gay rights situation in Russia will end badly.

Soccer-Russia says FIFA investigator Garcia unwelcome

Russian authorities have been on the lookout for illegal GM crops. Recently, the country’s National Association for Genetic Safety (NAGS) conducted its first checks of crops for the presence of GMOs, but none were found in any Belgorod fields. “We remind you that currently, according to the law in Russia , 19 GM lines are allowed in foodstuffs, but the cultivation of GMOs is not allowed,” said GM Watch. After its admission into the World Trade Organization, Russia became obligated to simplify the procedure for registering GM crops, products and feed, seek to stop their safety checks and end controls over their distribution, the GM Watch site reported. A year ago, as Natural News editor Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, reported, Russia banned all imports of GM corn, following an earlier study by French researchers which showed that rats grew massive cancer tumors when fed a lifetime of Monsanto’s genetically modified corn. “The Russian ban is the latest blow to Monsanto, a company desperately clinging to the myth that its genetically modified crops are ‘no different’ than traditional crops and therefore long-term safety testing is completely unnecessary,” Adams wrote, adding that Monsanto criticized the French study but did not duplicate the duration of it in its own testing. French researchers conducted their study over a two-year period, while Monsanto’s study lasted only 90 days. It’s not just Russia being Russia, folks Other nations have also moved to ban GM foods: — Earlier this year, Peru joined Ecuador as the second nation in the Americas to ban GMOs. Local Chef Pedro Miguel Schiaffino summarized the country’s rejection by recalling his decision to stop eating store-bought Roma tomatoes: “They’re a big monoculture, which is why people usually end up using GMOs. Because when you have monocultures, the crops end up getting diseases, and you have to look for these extreme ways to fix them.” Peru, the cradle of the once-great Inca Empire, is the birthplace of the crop , so it says much about a country where you can grow virtually anything to give up GM crops. — In June, South Korea joined a Japanese ban on U.S. wheat imports following an announcement by the U.S.

Russia considering total GMO ban

Garcia is stepping up his inquiry into voting procedures for the 2018 and 2022 soccer World Cups. He plans to visit every country directly involved in the voting for the finals awarded to Russia for 2018 and Qatar for 2022. But Garcia, a former U.S. federal prosecutor, is on a blacklist Moscow issued in June after Washington named 18 Russians barred from the United States for alleged involvement in lawyer Sergei Magnitsky’s death or other gross rights abuses. Garcia is barred from Russia because of his role in the prosecution of Viktor Bout, a Russian who was long wanted by U.S. authorities on suspicion of arms trafficking and is now serving a 25-year prison term in the United States. Russia’s “Guantanamo List” includes Americans it accuses of involved in torture at prisons and those involved in what it says have been the unfair, politically motivated arrests of Bout and other Russians by U.S. authorities. “Let there be no doubt: We intend to react firmly to unfriendly attacks and unceremonious infringements on the rights of Russian citizens,” the Foreign Ministry said on Thursday. “Anyone who is involved in such things should think hard.” The ministry said the United States would be to blame for any consequences of Garcia’s inability to enter Russia. “Questions arising in connection with visa blacklists should be addressed to the initiators and executors of the extraterritorial and discriminatory ‘Magnitsky Act’, which contradicts norms of international law,” it said. (Editing by Greg Stutchbury)