‘humans Of New York’ Fascinate Photographer Brandon Stanton

humans of new york

‘It’s a great program,’ explained the father. ‘I found it while searching for things he could do.'” Brandon Stanton The photographer becomes the subject. John Berube Like this topic? You may also like these photo galleries: Replay Last Slide Next Slide Blog becomes a book filled with New Yorkers of every stripe. Brandon Stanton explores the ‘Humans of New York’ in his blog, which is being published as a book. Story Highlights His new book of photos grew from his blog He interviews his subjects throughout the city “Storytelling” as important as the photography SHARE 22 CONNECT 15 TWEET COMMENTEMAILMORE It’s a gloomy day in New York, not great for taking pictures, and photographer Brandon Stanton is at home in Brooklyn. But not for long. When it gets dark, he says, he’ll take out his camera he doesn’t use a flash and go looking for “pockets of light” or well-lit streets and see what he finds. The random anonymous people (and occasional dog) he snaps will join his voluminous collection, Humans of New York, an ongoing blog and now a book (St. Martin’s Press, on sale Tuesday). New York and its colorful populace have proved irresistible to Stanton, 29, who made his way to the city three years ago after losing his job as a bond trader in Chicago. He has photographed about 5,000 New Yorkers of every age, every ethnic background, in every imaginable outfit (and usually in broad daylight). What started as a hobby became a passion and a profession, after he nearly starved the first year, he admits. “New York has the biggest, most eclectic collection of people in the world,” says the affable Stanton, whose work found a distinctive edge when he began talking to his subjects. Brandon Stanton in his element, photographing the ”Humans of New York.’ (Photo: John Berube) His photos are accompanied by little stories.

Capital New York Hires Three Columnists As Relaunch Nears

Now that Capital is close to filling up its reporter ranks on the politics and media desks, editors are lining up several weekly city columnists for the site’s early November relaunch. Capital’s first three columnists will be Jim Windolf, a Vanity Fair contributing editor who has written for several publications and started the New York Observer’s “New York World” column; Joanna Molloy, a veteran Daily News gossip writer and co-author of a new book on the subject; and Glynnis MacNicol, a writer and co-founder of TheLi.st and former media editor at Business Insider and Mediaite. The model will be more Jimmy Breslin than Joe Scarborough. While Politico columnists, like Scarborough or National Review editor Rich Lowry, comment on political and policy debates, Capital’s writers will produce reported columns that also express a point of view. They’ll draw from the city columnist tradition that extends from tabloid muckraking, a la Breslin, to the New York Times’ Clyde Haberman. Capital co-editor Tom McGeveran told HuffPost the new columns will focus on “New York issues, New York personalities and New York places.” “This is a tradition in which the best columns always entertain,” McGeveran said. “Sometimes they even change the minds of the city’s big decision makers; better yet is when a columnist changes their plans.” The new columnists are not joining full-time, but will write weekly for the site. However, Capital has been filling up the newsroom with full-time reporters and editors since Politico purchased the three-year-old site in September. On the politics front, Capital’s hired Daily News veteran Joanne Wasserman , the Albany Times Union’s Jimmy Vielkind , the New York Post’s Sally Goldenberg. Capital media reporter Joe Pompeo will now be joined on the desk by several additional reporters, including TV Newser’s Alex Weprin, Women’s Wear Daily’s Matthew Lynch, former Newsday and Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reporter Nicole Levy, and World Policy Journal’s Johana Bhuiyan. In addition, Peter Sterne will cover media part-time for the site while finishing at Columbia University. Follow Michael Calderone on Twitter: www.twitter.com/mlcalderone FOLLOW MEDIA

New York Comic Con 2013: The beauties and beasts

Yaya Han dressed as Madam Hydra.

You feel like youre the character, its a great feeling. Bryan Pace for New York Daily News Yaya Han dressed as Madam Hydra. RELATED: WHAT THE TREK IS GOING ON! Pratt Institute student Molly Glover, a huge Game of Thrones fan, recruited seven friends from school to form a human Iron Throne from the HBO fantasy series. The 20-year-old budding costume designer started in August and made the costume out of fabric and spray-painted pool noodles. Bryan Pace for New York Daily News 25-year-old Sarah Nielsen dressed as Black Widow. I wanted to find people who were willing to contribute and all of my friends graciously accepted, said Glover. Bryan Pace for New York Daily News Stacey Weiland dressed as Mad Moxie from the video game Borderlands. Even Game of Thrones actor Jerome Flynn was impressed, and took time to sit on the throne between signing autographs. This event was surreal as it was, but sitting on a load of fans isnt what I expected to happen, the British actor told the News, but New York is full of surprises. Bryan Pace for New York Daily News 25-year-old Jennifer Hashimoto dressed as Cat Women. RELATED: NEW YORK COMIC CON 2013: ZACH GALIFIANAKIS, KEN JEONG, BOBCAT GOLDTHWAIT JOIN BOBS BURGERS SEASON FOUR At the ripe old age of 3, aspiring Wonder Woman Tesla Muchado is already a three-year veteran of New York Comic Con and was excited to pose for a photo with an adult, Helene Waldermarson, 26, dressed as her favorite superhero. Bryan Pace for New York Daily News “Joker” 30 y/o Carlos Maya feeds his “Batman” son 6-month-old Isaac Maya. Im Wonder Woman, said Tesla. I like all Wonder Womans! Richard Benitez, 21, South Ozone Park, decided he wanted to dress up as Aquaman five months ago in a golden chain-mail shirt that took him 50 hours to sew by hand. Bryan Pace for New York Daily News 25-year-old Nicole Marino and 18-year-old Canielle Marion attend as Purple and Red Raven of the Teen Titans.

Airbnb host creates petition to confront New York lawmakers

Airbnb host creates petition to confront New York lawmakers The battle between Airbnb and New York state becomes more entrenched as thousands of members sign a petition asking lawmakers to fix a “poorly written law” and allow them to operate freely. (Credit: Screenshot by Donna Tam/CNET) Airbnb just got a few thousand more supporters in its ongoing dispute with New York state. The rent-out-your-home service has thrown its weight behind a petition authored by a New York City host named Mishelle. In the petition, she asks the state’s senate to fix what she calls a “poorly written law,” which could curb Airbnb’s reach in the region. “The reason this is happening is because of a poorly written law originally designed to stop slumlords from running illegal hotels with dozens of rental apartments,” Mishelle writes. “As a New Yorker just trying to pay my bills, I don’t understand why they think I’m a slumlord.” “I figure that if we get 20,000 people to sign the petition, we’ll get the state Senate’s attention,” she continues. “If we hit that goal by October 20th, I pledge to deliver the signatures to every senator myself.” As of this writing the petition has more than 18,500 signatures, the majority of which were gathered within the last 24 hours. Airbnb also got behind the petition on Monday by sending out an e-mail to its thousands of New York members. One member forwarded the e-mail to CNET. “The New York attorney general has subpoenaed the records of almost all of our New York hosts,” Airbnb’s global head of community Douglas Atkin wrote in the e-mail. “We are fighting the subpoena with all we’ve got, but poorly written laws make for even worse enforcement, and unless you help to stop it once and for all, the laws may never get better and New Yorkers will continue to suffer.” The debacle between New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman and Airbnb has been ongoing over the past year, but it got heated when Schneiderman filed a subpoena earlier this month. The subpoena requests three years’ worth of data on thousands of Airbnb New York hosts. Airbnb has said that it has 225,000 community members in New York. The Attorney General’s Office is specifically looking for data on 15,000 hosts — it’s unclear if this includes almost all of Airbnb’s New York hosts.