Seizures Turned Into Music With Help Of ‘brain Stethoscope’ (audio)

“My initial interest was an artistic one at heart, but, surprisingly, we could instantly differentiate seizure activity from non-seizure states with just our ears,” Chafe, a professor of music research at the university, said in a written statement. “It was like turning a radio dial from a static-filled station to a clear one.” The researchers say their “brain stethoscope” could lead to the development of a biofeedback device that would make it possible for caregivers to detect seizures in people with epilepsy simply by listening to their brain wave activity. “Someone – perhaps a mother caring for a child — who hasn’t received training in interpreting visual EEGs [electroencephalograms] can hear the seizure rhythms and easily appreciate that there is a pathological brain phenomenon taking place,” Parvizi, associate professor of neurology at the university, said in the statement. Also on HuffPost: Loading Slideshow The Brain As Art Wellcome Trust employee Zoe Middleton poses for the media by a work entitled ‘My Soul’ by artist Katherine Dawson, that is a laser etched in lead crystal glass of the artist’s own MRI scan, at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March, 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) French Phrenological Model A French Phrenological model, from the mid 19th century, of a head with brain exposed is seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains – The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Pathologies In Brain Specimens A selection of brain specimens preserved in acrylic illustrating different pathologies on loan from the Mutter Museum -The College of Physicians of Philadelphia are seen on display at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Surgical Skull Holes A Bronze Age skull from Jericho in the West Bank that shows four holes made by the ancient surgical process of trephination carried out to treat a range of medical conditions, some of which were believed to have been caused by evil spirits, is on display at the exhibition ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) Diagrams of the Skull A member of the media takes an image of diagrams of the human skull at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012. The free exhibition is open to the public from March 29- June 17. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant) ‘Brains – Mind as Matter’ A Wellcome Trust employee stands in front of a video that journeys through slices of the brain in a kaleidoscope of colour at an exhibition call ‘Brains -The Mind as Matter’ at the Wellcome Collection in London, Tuesday, March 27, 2012.

Music Center to Present Mandolins of the Blue Ridge

For Pemberton, which hopes to nab most of B.C.s festival-going audience early next summer with a July 18-20 schedule (the same weekend, it must be said, as the Vancouver Folk Fest and Surreys Fusion Festival). its about making a statement. The resurrected festival is putting all its money on not repeating the errors of 2008, when traffic and other logistical problems overshadowed top notch performances by Jay Z, Coldplay, the Flaming Lips and others. New promoters Huka Entertainment are obviously banking on their lack of connection with Live Nation, who shouldered most of the blame following 2008s event ( the second question on their FAQ page is an obvious jab at the previous organizers ). Their track record running destination festivals like the beach-bound Hangout Music Festival in Gulf Shores, Alabama, is a bonus, hinting at a value-added experience. The promise of top shelf talent similar to what Huka have booked via their other properties is also alluring, though none of it has been revealed yet. On the other hand, the Squamish Valley Music Festival has proven it can serve 17,000 fans daily extremely well, and next year it hopes to almost double that number, with capacity being expanded to 35,000 (ironically, the same capacity as the new Pemberton fest). The festival has been branding itself as a destination fest as well, with the dual team of promoters brand.LIVE and Live Nation doing a fine job at growing the event organically over the past four years. Lately, the festival modified its scheduling (it now runs the first weekend of August) to align itself with other major events like Montreals Osheaga, Chicagos Lollapalooza and San Franciscos Outside Lands. The move is critical in attracting bigger acts and expanding to a wider format next year. But you can feel the Pemberton push is making Squamish jittery.

Music festival battle brewing in B.C. with Squamish, Pemberton vying for top spot

You can leave a response or trackback to this entry In 2012, participants at the Old Fiddlers Convention in Galax broke the Guinness Book of World Records for the most mandolin players in one place 389. Previously the record was held in Germany. The sheerpopularityof the versatile instrument in both old-time and bluegrass music in the mountains continues to grow. On Sunday, October 6, 2013, at 2pm the Blue Ridge Music Center will feature four outstanding mandolinists and one luthier in a performance/ talk about regarding the instruments construction and playing styles in the Blue Ridge. Performers include: Scott Freeman, David Long, Carl Jones and Gerald Anderson.Gerald Anderson began making mandolins over 30 years ago in Wayne Hendersons guitar shop. Soon he developed an interest in making his own fine-quality instruments and opened up his own shop in Troutdale, Virginia. Over the past 30 years, Anderson has made over 60 guitars and 140 mandolins. Gerald also plays old-time and bluegrass music with success and has won over 200 ribbons including 1st place guitar at the Old Fiddlers Convention in Galax in 2003. Scott Freeman grew up in a musical family in Mount Airy, North Carolina. He and his three brothers all learned to play bluegrass and gospel. Scott plays guitar and fiddle too but he has always favored the mandolin. Early on David Grisman was one of his influences along with traditional players so Scott is as comfortable with swing or jazz as he is with bluegrass.