Usa Today College Football Poll 2013: Complete Week 7 Rankings Released

Namely, the two thirds of the people who have already applied for disability and been rejected. There’s not much to lose, really. It doesn’t cost you anything unless you win the appeal and the lawyers collect from the federal government. Marilyn Zahm: If the American public knew what was going on in our system, half would be outraged and the other half would apply for benefits. Marilyn Zahm and Randy Frye are two of the country’s 1,500 disability judges. They are also the president and vice president of the Association of Administrative Law Judges. They are each expected to read, hear, and decide up to 700 appeals a year to clear a backlog of nearly a million cases. They say disability lawyers have flooded the system with cases that shouldn’t be there. Marilyn Zahm: In 1971, fewer than 20 percent of claimants were represented. Now, over 80 percent of claimants are represented by attorneys or representatives. Steve Kroft: Why do you think there’s so many more lawyers involved in this than there used to be? Marilyn Zahm: It’s lucrative. Randy Frye: Follow the money. Last year the Social Security Administration paid a billion dollars to claimants’ lawyers out of its cash-strapped disability trust fund.

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“USA Boxing does not have the funds to compete with your offers,” Dr. Charles Butler, USA boxing president, said. “If you have money and would like to assist these young athletes and the sport, you should donate for athletes’ stipends to support the training of these boxers and help your country regain its prominence on the medal stand.” Now, no one in their right (or left) hemisphere would say Mike Tyson is walking around with a halo hovering over his head as he tries to get his post-Broadway career off the ground by getting into boxing promotions. [+] Enlarge AP/Richard Shotwell/Invision USA Boxing sent an open letter to Mike Tyson, asking him to wait until after the 2016 Rio Games to sign the country’s top amateur fighters. But if Tyson wants to move past pigeon-racing reality shows on Animal Plant or another academy award-winning guest appearance in “The Hangover IV: A New Hope” and make his move to be the next Don King, who are we — or USA Boxing — to complain? Tyson has done so well with his life since he left the sport (as long as he does not revert to the misbehavior he exhibited after longtime trainer Cus D’Amato died, then all is good). But this isn’t about Tyson or his response to Butler’s letter in the New York Post claiming the organization never reached out to him directly and is “taking advantage of my name and company for publicity.” This is about USA Boxing. When did USA Boxing become so sanctimonious? So righteous and indignant? Boxing promoters have perpetually gone after amateur boxers in an attempt to get them to skip the Olympic route. For years, promoters have used everything from Muhammad Ali throwing his gold medal into the Ohio River to the image of Roy Jones Jr. standing next to a ref as he lifted the arm of Park Si-Hun in the Seoul Olympics (considered by many as one of the most corrupt moments in Olympic history) as examples of the unimportance of the Olympics in the arc of one’s career. More recently, promoters simply need to run off the names of top boxers who didn’t need an Olympic medal to succeed as a pro — Manny Pacquiao, Miguel Cotto, Juan Manuel Marquez, Adrien Broner, Timothy Bradley — to prove that participating in the Olympics is as useful as an iPhone 3GS. After Athens 2004, USA Boxing had been able to say to every American who has thought about joining them: “Look at Andre Ward’s career, and we’ll show you how Ward benefited from being in the Olympics.” But when a country goes through an entire Olympics as the United States did at London 2012 and returns without a single medal, the sell gets difficult. Tyson is doing nothing different from any other promoter in the game since boxing became a free enterprise for promotion and hype.

Update: Ohio State is still No. 3, Clemson No. 4 in #CoachesPoll . Corrected rankings here: USA TODAY Sports (@USATODAYsports) October 6, 2013 —End of update— The Top Five held steady this week, with the No. 1 Alabama Crimson Tide remaining on top after rolling past Georgia State in blowout fashion. They have not allowed a touchdown on defense for the three straight weeks. Oregon holds on to the No. 2 position after decimating Pac-12 rival Colorado. The Ducks will finally have a true test against No. 19Washington next week. Speaking of the Huskies, they lost a heartbreaker to No. 5 Stanford, as the Cardinal hung on to win a 31-28 battle that came down to the wire. Clemson and Ohio State once again round out the top-five again this week. The No. 4 Tigers decimated Syracuse, while the No. 3 Buckeyes had to stave off a feisty Northwestern squad.